BILL H.R. 2224, 344, 4998  

TO ALL COALITION MEMBERS:

The following message is from Coalition Vice Chairwoman and Gulf War Illness Chairwoman, Denise Nichols:

"We need your help. Please write letters to Senate VA committee members, House VA Committee members, your senators and your reps. This is imperative and a fast action item needing your immediate attention. Please email Denise at DSNurse@aol.com and us here to let us know when you send your letters, emails, and faxes so we can follow up with direct contact. We need to act now to get the December 31, 2006 end date on gulf war illness terminated. When writing your reps in DC, remind them that the date for AO was done away with and so should the date of GWI. PLEASE HELP!"

 
 

Also, please review the following pieces of legislation pertaining to Desert Storm POW's--HR 2224--which provides for payment of claim of United States prisoners of war in the first Gulf War... H.CON R. 344--expressing the sense of Congress as to the compensation of American prisoners of war from the first Gulf War...and H.R. 4998--to make funds available to pay the U.S. prisoners of war that have brought suit against the government of Iraq.

From: DSNurse@aol.com
To: mack1863@hotmail.com, mack1863@peoplepc.com
Subject: Post on website Action item 2
Date: Jan 12, 2006 1:26 AM

 

Prisoner of War Protection Act of 2003 (Introduced in House)

HR 2224 IH


108th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 2224

To provide for the payment of claims of United States prisoners of war in the First Gulf War , and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

May 22, 2003
Mrs. CAPITO (for herself, Mr. GOODE, and Mr. CAMP) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on International Relations, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A BILL
To provide for the payment of claims of United States prisoners of war in the First Gulf War , and for other purposes.


Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `Prisoner of War Protection Act of 2003'.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

The Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The mistreatment of prisoners of war of the United States has been a serious recurring problem in war after war , and is of immediate concern to the Nation.

(2) The United States takes great pride in the protection of its service men and women, and finds intolerable the recurring pattern of mistreatment of its prisoners of war .

(3) The Third Geneva Convention mandates that prisoners of war must at all times be treated humanely, and that the willful killing, torture, or inhuman treatment or willfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health are `grave breaches' of the Convention.

(4) Article 129 of the Third Geneva Convention mandates that `Each High Contracting Party shall be under the obligation to search for persons alleged to have committed, or to have ordered to be committed . . . grave breaches, and shall bring such persons, regardless of their nationality, before its own courts.'.

(5) Article 131 of the Third Geneva Convention provides that `No High Contracting Party shall be allowed to absolve itself or any other High Contracting Party of any liability incurred by itself or by another High Contracting Party in respect of [grave] breaches . . .'.

(6) Both the United States and the Republic of Iraq are High Contracting Parties to the Third Geneva Convention, and more than 170 countries, as state parties to the convention, have assumed its obligations.

(7) The Third Geneva Convention mandates that prisoners of war `must at all times be protected . . . against insults and public curiosity'; the Iraqi practice in both the First and Second Gulf Wars of subjecting United States prisoners of war to coerced propaganda videotapes is therefore a violation of the Convention.

(8) During the First Gulf War , the House of Representatives, in response to the propaganda videotapes, passed House Concurrent Resolution 48 on January 23, 1991, by a vote of 418-0, condemning `the flagrant and deliberate violations' by Iraq resulting in the brutal torture and inhumane treatment of United States prisoners of war during that war , and the Senate, also in response to the patent abuse of the prisoners of war , passed Senate Concurrent Resolution 5 on January 24, 1991, by a vote of 99-0, demanding that `Iraq abide by the principles and the obligations of the Third Geneva Convention concerning the treatment of prisoners of war . . . .' and condemning Iraq's failure to do so; subsequently, Iraq ignored these resolutions of the Congress and continued to brutally mistreat United States prisoners of war .

(9) Seventeen United States prisoners of war from the First Gulf War and 37 of their family members have brought an historic action in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia against the Republic of Iraq, the Iraqi Intelligence Service, and Saddam Hussein in his capacity as President of the Republic of Iraq, for the brutal torture of the prisoners of war while held by Iraq during the First Gulf War . In this action--

(A) an entry of default was entered against defendants on September 25, 2002; and

(B) the factual and legal submissions for a judgment by the court, including detailed sworn affidavits as to Iraq's brutal torture, were submitted to the court on March 31, 2003.

Those sworn affidavits show shocking brutality directed against the United States prisoners of war by Iraq.

(10) The Congress determined, in enacting section 1605(a)(7) of title 28, United States Code, permitting suit against terrorist states for personal injury or death caused by an act of torture, which was the legal basis for this historic action against Iraq by the tortured United States prisoners of war , that substantial civil damages are an important additional deterrent against such acts of torture directed against nationals of the United States.

(11) The Republic of Iraq and its agencies, instrumentalities, and controlled entities had approximately $1,730,000,000 in blocked assets in the United States at the start of the Second Gulf War .

(12) Those assets were vested by the Executive Order 13290 of March 20, 2003, for the purpose of assisting in the reconstruction of Iraq.

(13) Approximately $300,000,000 of the blocked assets were initially set aside for the satisfaction of civil judgments obtained by United States hostages held in Iraq during the First Gulf War , but no amount of the blocked assets was set aside for those plaintiffs who were United States prisoners of war and who, at that time, already had an entry of default against Iraq.

(14) The plaintiffs in the historic case against Saddam Hussein and Iraq who were United States prisoners of war have established a nonprofit Foundation for the assistance of United States and Allied prisoners of war and those missing in action and their families, and have pledged to the court that a substantial amount of any noncompensatory damages realized from the case will be donated to the new Foundation.

(15) The Republic of Iraq has great national wealth, with proven oil reserves of at least 110,000,000,000 barrels, second only to Saudi Arabia, and 3 times those of the United States, and when its reserves are fully developed they may even exceed those of Saudi Arabia.

(16) Other nations have not absolved Iraq of its state obligations under the Third Geneva Convention arising from the First Gulf War and other sources, and the torture and inhuman treatment of United States prisoners of war during the First Gulf War are, in any event, a `non-absolvable liability' of the state of Iraq.

(17) Iraq has not accounted for one of the United States prisoners of war held by Iraq during the First Gulf War .

(18) In the Second Gulf War , Iraq is in violation of the Third Geneva Convention by subjecting United States prisoners of war to coerced propaganda videotapes, and there are disturbing reports of the willful killing and mistreatment of United States prisoners of war by Iraq, violations condemned in Senate Concurrent Resolution 31, which passed on April 9, 2003, by a vote of 99-0, and in House Concurrent Resolution 118, which passed on March 27, 2003, by a vote of 419-0.

(19) The United States has a critical national interest in ensuring the protection of United States prisoners of war , enhancing compliance with the Third Geneva Convention, and in taking immediate decisive action that could contribute to the protection of United States prisoners of war .

SEC. 3. POLICY REGARDING PERSONS.

(a) POLICY- It is the policy of the United States, in accordance with article 129 of the Third Geneva Convention, to search out and try before its courts persons alleged to have committed, or to have ordered to be committed, grave breaches of the Third Geneva Convention against United States prisoners of war , including willful killing, torture, and inhumane treatment.

(b) IMPLEMENTATION- The United States will vigorously implement the policy set forth in subsection (a) toward those persons who have mistreated United States prisoners of war during the First and Second Gulf Wars, including those in the Iraqi Government who have ordered or carried out any such mistreatment.

SEC. 4. POLICIES REGARDING COUNTRIES.

(a) POLICY- It is the policy of the United States, in accordance with article 131 of the Third Geneva Convention, to hold liable countries that commit grave breaches against United States prisoners of war , including willful killing, torture, and inhumane treatment. As a High Contracting Party to the Third Geneva Convention, the United States will not absolve such states of any such liability.

(b) PAYMENT OF CLAIMS- In carrying out the policy set forth in subsection (a), the Secretary of the Treasury, at the request of the plaintiffs, shall pay from the Treasury, in full, but in an amount not exceeding the sum of those blocked funds of Iraq and its agencies, instrumentalities, and controlled entities that were vested by Executive Order 13290 of March 20, 2003, for the purpose of assisting in the reconstruction of Iraq, any judgment in Civil Action No. 02-0632 in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia brought by United States prisoners of war and their family members against the Republic of Iraq, the Iraqi Intelligence Service, and Saddam Hussein in his capacity as President of the Republic of Iraq, for the brutal torture of those United States prisoners of war during the First Gulf War . The United States shall be fully subrogated against the Republic of Iraq for payments made under this subsection.

SEC. 5. POLICY WITH RESPECT TO PRISONERS OF WAR IN SECOND GULF WAR .

If, following the Second Gulf War , it becomes evident that United States prisoners of war have been killed, tortured, or mistreated during that war , or that the unaccounted for United States prisoner of war from the First Gulf War was killed or tortured by Iraq, it shall be the policy of the United States to support the claims of those United States prisoners of war and their immediate family members against the Republic of Iraq, for resolution on the basis of the same policy as is set forth in section 4.

SEC. 6. DEFINITION.

In this Act, the term `Third Geneva Convention' means the Geneva Convention of 1949 relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War .


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

H.R.2224
Title: To provide for the payment of claims of United States prisoners of war in the First Gulf War, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep Capito, Shelley Moore [WV-2] (introduced 5/22/2003) Cosponsors (15)
Latest Major Action: 6/25/2003 Referred to House subcommittee. Status: Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and Claims.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
All Information (except text) Text of Legislation CRS Summary Major Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions with Amendments
With links to Congressional Record pages, votes,reports
Titles Cosponsors (15) Committees
Related Bills Amendments Related Committee Documents
CBO Cost Estimates Subjects


THOMAS Home | Contact | Accessibility | Legal | FirstGov GPO's PDF Display Congressional Record References Bill Summary & Status Printer Friendly Display - 7,118 bytes.[Help]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expressing the sense of the Congress that American prisoners of war (POWs) during the 1991 Gulf War and their immediate family members should be adequately compensated, without delay,... (Introduced in House)

HCON 344 IH


108th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. CON. RES. 344
Expressing the sense of the Congress that American prisoners of war (POWs) during the 1991 Gulf War and their immediate family members should be adequately compensated, without delay, for their suffering and injury, as decided by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

November 21, 2003
Mr. MEEKS of New York (for himself and Mr. CONYERS) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
Expressing the sense of the Congress that American prisoners of war (POWs) during the 1991 Gulf War and their immediate family members should be adequately compensated, without delay, for their suffering and injury, as decided by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.

Whereas the treatment of American prisoners of war (POWs) during 1991 Gulf War by the Republic of Iraq and its intelligence service, at the direction of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, constituted `torture,' as required to support exercise of subject matter jurisdiction under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) over claims by the POWs and their immediate family members for compensatory and punitive damages for injuries allegedly suffered as result of such treatment;

Whereas the POWs constantly feared torture and death as a direct result of severe physical and mental abuse; they were systematically starved, denied sleep, and exposed to freezing cold; they were denied medical care and their existing injuries were intentionally aggravated; they were shocked with electrical devices and confined in dark, filthy conditions exposing them to contagion and infection; they suffered serious physical injuries, including broken bones, perforated eardrums, nerve damage infections, nausea, severe weight loss, massive bruises, and other injuries; and they were denied requests to notify family members that they were alive, were forced to participate in propaganda tapes, were denied the right to be inspected by the Red Cross, and were used as props in public announcements that POWs would be used as human shields;

Whereas these acts of torture intentionally inflicted severe and lasting emotional distress;

Whereas these acts of torture were carried out by officials, employees, or agents of the Republic of Iraq, acting within scope of their office or employment;

Whereas the refusal of the Republic of Iraq and its intelligence service to comply with Iraq's legal obligation under the Geneva Convention to permit the POWs to write to their families to inform them of their capture and state of their health constituted intentional infliction of emotional stress on the family members of the POWs, also cognizable in an action under the FSIA;

Whereas the United States District Court for the District of Columbia found, in an action brought under the torture exception of the FSIA against the Republic of Iraq, its president, and its intelligence service, that the POWs subjected to torture during 1991 Gulf War were entitled to compensatory damages;

Whereas the court also found that the POWs were entitled to compensatory damages for pain and suffering, during the period following captivity, as the POWs attempted to return to normal life, in amounts in multiple millions of dollars;

Whereas the court found that the wives of the POWs were entitled to compensatory damages for mental anguish and solatium during the periods in which their husbands were in captivity, and for mental anguish and emotional distress following the release of POWs, and the court found that the children, parents, and siblings of the POWs were entitled to compensatory damages for mental anguish and solatium;

Whereas the court also found that an award of punitive damages to the POWs was warranted because of the exceedingly heinous nature of the acts of torture against the POWs, and the severe and continuing harm to the POWs caused by the reprehensible acts inflicted on them, and because--

(1) the use of torture against the handcuffed and blindfolded POWs resulted in unrestrained savagery, causing them to suffer intense, justified fear that the Iraqi threats of death and dismemberment would be carried out;

(2) there must be a premium on protecting POWs who are uniquely vulnerable to acts of torture;

(3) deterring torture of POWs should be of the highest priority; and

(4) punitive damages create incentives for the agencies and instrumentalities of terrorist countries to comply with their obligations not to torture POWs: Now, therefore, be it


Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That--

(1) American prisoners of war (POWs) during the 1991 Gulf War were brutally tortured by the Republic of Iraq and its intelligence service, at the direction of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, and thereby suffered severe physical trauma and emotional abuse;

(2) United States civilians stationed in the Persian Gulf region before and during Operation Desert Storm were taken hostage by the Republic of Iraq and its intelligence service, at the direction of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, and used as so-called `human shields', experiencing brutal threats to their personal safety and emotional being;

(3) no one would subject himself or herself for any price to the terror, torment, and pain experienced by the POWs during the 1991 Gulf War and their immediate family members;

(4) there is no monetary award that could adequately compensate these individuals for their suffering and the resulting permanent injury;

(5) the Congress has previously recognized and authorized the right of United States citizens, including the POWs and `human shields', to hold terrorist states such as Iraq liable for injuries to United States citizens;

(6) United States district courts have been authorized to adjudicate such cases;

(7) notwithstanding section 1503 of the Emergency Wartime Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2003, the President should take action, through the liquidation of blocked Iraqi assets or through other appropriate sources, to ensure that POWs during the 1991 Gulf War and their immediate family members receive, without delay, their just compensation as awarded by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia; and

(8) the Congress will continue to oversee the application of section 1503 of the Emergency Wartime Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2003 in order to ensure that it is not misinterpreted, including by divesting United States courts of jurisdiction, with respect to the POWs and other victims of Iraqi terrorism.

H.CON.RES.344
Title: Expressing the sense of the Congress that American prisoners of war (POWs) during the 1991 Gulf War and their immediate family members should be adequately compensated, without delay, for their suffering and injury, as decided by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.
Sponsor: Rep Meeks, Gregory W. [NY-6] (introduced 11/21/2003) Cosponsors (13)
Latest Major Action: 11/21/2003 Referred to House committee. Status: Referred to the House Committee on International Relations.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
All Information (except text) Text of Legislation CRS Summary Major Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions with Amendments
With links to Congressional Record pages, votes,reports
Titles Cosponsors (13) Committees
Related Bills Amendments Related Committee Documents
CBO Cost Estimates Subjects


THOMAS Home | Contact | Accessibility | Legal | FirstGov
To make funds available to pay the United States prisoners of war that brought suit against the Government of Iraq in the case of Acree v. Republic of Iraq. (Introduced in House)

HR 4998 IH


108th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. R. 4998
To make funds available to pay the United States prisoners of war that brought suit against the Government of Iraq in the case of Acree v. Republic of Iraq.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

July 22, 2004
Mr. STRICKLAND introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A BILL
To make funds available to pay the United States prisoners of war that brought suit against the Government of Iraq in the case of Acree v. Republic of Iraq.


Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. PAYMENTS TO UNITED STATES PRISONERS OF WAR BASED ON COURT JUDGMENT.

(a) Payments- The Secretary of the Treasury shall pay, out of funds described in subsection (b), $1,000,000 to each of the 17 plaintiffs in the case of Acree v. Republic of Iraq, 271 F.Supp. 2d 179 (D.D.C. 2003) that were held captive by Iraq during the first Gulf War .

(b) Source of Funds- $17,000,000 shall be available, from unobligated funds appropriated under chapter 2 of title II of the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense and for the Reconstruction of Iraq and Afghanistan, 2004, under the heading `OTHER BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE--Funds Appropriated to the President--IRAQ RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION FUND', for payments under subsection (a).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

H.R.4998
Title: To make funds available to pay the United States prisoners of war that brought suit against the Government of Iraq in the case of Acree v. Republic of Iraq.
Sponsor: Rep Strickland, Ted [OH-6] (introduced 7/22/2004) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 7/22/2004 Referred to House committee. Status: Referred to the House Committee on International Relations.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
All Information (except text) Text of Legislation CRS Summary Major Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions with Amendments
With links to Congressional Record pages, votes,reports
Titles Cosponsors (None) Committees
Related Bills Amendments Related Committee Documents
CBO Cost Estimates Subjects


<<Back